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An Implant Aids A Stockton Woman In Controlling Her Epileptic Seizures.

epileptic seizures.

Because of advancements in the control of epileptic seizures, some patients with this condition are able to live a near-normal life. “They last about 30 seconds to a minute and feel like imminent ruin and disorientation,” said Hannah Thomas, 29, of epilepsy, which is characterised by random seizures and affects approximately 3.5 million people in the United States. increase. Thomas was in college when what appeared to be a panic attack turned out to be an epileptic seizure. “I go through the day without them, and then I want five a day,” Thomas explained. Her condition hasn’t improved in nearly six years.

“After trying many drugs, I discovered that my epilepsy is drug resistant,” she explained. Dosing and surgery were out of the question, but I had another chance. And Dr. Lau introduced me, saying, “I believe you are the ideal candidate.” “I went to it,” Thomas explained. Vikram Lau, a neurologist at the University of California, San Francisco, is the Dr. Lau she mentions. “Drugs can control seizures in two-thirds of people.” Hannah, unfortunately, was not one of those people. “We tried everything, but her seizures persisted,” Lau explained. Lau suggested that a seizure-relieving implant be implanted in Hannah’s head. When a seizure occurs, the unit sends an electrical pulse to the area to stop the seizure. “If you hear a seizure is about to start, you can respond to that detection by sending an electrical pulse to the focus of the seizure, and those pulses can be stopped on the truck before causing problems to the individual,” he said.

Seizures and Epilepsy in Multiple Sclerosis

“I’m gradually reintroducing my toes into the pond.” I intend to further my education. I’m more self-sufficient. “I’m not afraid,” she stated. Returning to her life prior to the onset of seizures entails being able to drive again, owing to the abilities to monitor her. “It’s as if it’s day and night. “It’s like before I couldn’t see the light at the end of the tunnel, and now I know something is there,” she explained. Thomas has had fewer seizures and their severity has been significantly reduced since the implant surgery. She has withheld her education and wishes to return to college to pursue a degree in social work. Because of advancements in the control of epileptic seizures, some patients with this condition are able to live a near-normal life.”They last about 30 seconds to a minute, and it just feels like impending disaster and disorientation,” said Hannah Thomas, 29.Random seizures characterise epilepsy, which affects approximately 3.5 million people in the United States.Thomas was in college when she had an epileptic seizure that she mistook for a panic attack.”I spend a few times a day at times.” “I go through the day without them, and then I want five a day,” Thomas explained.

Her condition did not improve for nearly six years.”After trying many drugs, I discovered that my epilepsy is drug resistant,” she explained.Dosing and surgery were out of the question, but there was another option.”And Dr. Lau introduced me, saying, ‘I think you’re the ideal candidate.'” I had nothing else to lose at the time, so I just went with it.” Thomas stated.Vikram Lau, the doctor she mentions, is a neurologist at the University of California, San Francisco.”Drugs can control seizures in two-thirds of people.” Hannah, unfortunately, was not one of those people. “We tried everything, but her seizures persisted,” Lau explained. Lau suggested implanting a device in Hannah’s head to alleviate her seizures.”From an earthquake standpoint, place the wire that goes into the brain near the epicentre of the seizure, where the seizure occurs,” Lau said.

Epilepsy Symptoms and Causes

When the monitor detects the onset of a seizure, it sends an electrical pulse to the affected area to stop the seizure.”If you detect that a seizure is about to start, you can respond by sending an electrical pulse to the focal point of the seizure, and those pulses can be stopped on the truck before causing problems to the individual.” He stated. Thomas found the implants to be a godsend.”I’m gradually reintroducing my toes into the pond.” I intend to further my education. I’m more self-sufficient. “I’m not afraid,” she stated. And, thanks to the technology that monitors her, she will be able to drive again, allowing her to return to her life prior to the onset of seizures.”It’s as if it’s day and night. “It’s like I couldn’t see the light at the end of the tunnel before, and now I feel like I know something,” she explained. a rice field Thomas has had fewer seizures and their severity has been significantly reduced since the implant surgery. She had put her education on hold and now wishes to return to college to pursue a degree in social work.

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